Listen Up, Leaders! Being More Empathetic with Employees Pays Off | DCR Workforce Blog

Listen Up, Leaders! Being More Empathetic with Employees Pays Off

The greatest asset any company can have are its employees. And it’s no secret that people are complicated. We all have a lot going on, and being cooperative with each other can be difficult at times. Yet we all have to collaborate with each other to produce the best results to benefit our company.

For everyone to work at their optimal level requires some specific traits in leadership. A more personable, empathetic style that creates and maintains relationships with employees is not just something you “might” want to do, it’s a necessity in this day and age – and even more so with Millennials.

Listen up

I know some managers would read this and say: “We care about our bottom line. We don’t need to become someone’s therapist.” And you would be right. Workers are hired to do a job, and are compensated justly to perform. In addition, trying to help some employees may mean having to deal with problems that don’t affect their performance but are more emotional in nature.

However, one main point no manager can deny is the fact that employees in this current workforce are much tougher to retain, which results in managers having to adopt a more personal style of management that requires empathy.

So we know that we have to be more caring and empathetic, but how do we do this in an appropriate and effective way?

Listening skills – Empathetic people are more interested in hearing what others have to say. Hence, they don’t talk much because they want to see what the needs are of the person speaking. Most communication is non-verbal, so they’re adept at paying attention to people’s body language and tone.

Keeping it in perspective – I know you’re the boss, but you don’t have to get your way on everything. Learning to meet a person half way is a valuable skill. Besides, as long as you get productivity, compromising on small things isn’t such a deal killer. Furthermore, not judging others is a good start to putting yourself in someone else’s shoes and trying to help others.

It’s clear that the bottom line is imperative, but creating a nurturing work environment for your employees provides security for both the staff and managers. Having an emotionally healthy environment is seriously taken for granted…but it shouldn’t be. You’d be surprised how much all of us need a workplace where we feel understood.

 


Disclaimer:
The content on this blog is for informational purposes only and cannot be construed as specific legal advice or as a substitute for competent legal advice. They reflect the opinions of DCR Workforce and may not reflect the opinions of any individual attorney. Do contact an attorney for advice specific to your issue or problem.
Elise is DCR’s HR Manager responsible for everything from compliance to employee relations to admin to just plain old fun. She believe in an “I’m on it” approach when it comes to dealing with being proactive and going above and beyond on the job or when conquering new projects, changes, and challenges.